WMS

Common Installation Issues with XMS

Are you having trouble installing GMS, SMS, or WMS? Here are three common installation issues, and how to overcome them.

Virtual Machines

The main issues when using virtual machines is selecting the correct type of installation. Single-user locks are not compatible with virtual environments. If you are trying to install XMS with a single-user lock and a virtual machine is detected, XMS will not install. You will need a network lock to get around this issue. Network locks are designed to be used with virtual machines. Single-user locks are not capable of being used as a network lock.

Firewalls and User Permissions

Sometimes, a good password will fail to install XMS, This is because your computer actually needs to contact our servers to verify the authenticity of the password. When an internet error comes up, it's typically related to a firewall, user permissions, or antivirus software blocking the connection to our servers.

Try one of these solutions to resolve this issue:

  • Whitelist which ever XMS program you are trying to install and the registration wizard.
  • Temporarily disable the firewall/antivirus software.

Note that firewalls are typically something each company's IT department handles.

If you are running Windows 8 or 10, and you are not running in a virtual environment, then the issue could be caused by a Windows feature called Hyper-V. Disabling Hyper-V can resolve the problem. You can find instructions on how to disable Hyper-V by reading this article.

Hardware locks

When installing a hardware lock, be sure to have your drivers installed and running before attempting to register the lock. Additionally, please also ensure that the lock is plugged into the computer at the time you are attempting to register. (Note that as a security measure, the reburn cannot take place remotely.) For instructions on how to install your specific type of hardware lock please visit our page here.

Feel free to contact our technical support team at support@aquaveo.com for more individual help in troubleshooting any of these problems. Please recognize that Aquaveo technical support can only help troubleshoot individual machine issues to a certain point.

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Tips for Managing Cross Sections in WMS

Cross sections are commonly used in 1D models within WMS. Here we discuss a few things to help you better model using cross sections.

When you create cross sections in WMS, you must create them on "1D-Hyd Cross Section" coverage. You then create the arcs on this coverage to represent the cross sections.There are a few things you should remember when setting up your cross sections:

  • Cross sections should be located at fairly frequent intervals along the river. This makes sure the characterization of the stream channel and floodplain flow and capacity is accurate, which gives you better results.
  • You should place cross sections especially at locations of significant change, where levees begin and end, at hydraulic structures, and around stream junctions.
  • The cross section arcs should generally stretch from one side of the river floodplain to the other.
  • They should be generally perpendicular to the river arc where they cross.
  • Cross section arcs should not cross each other.
Hydraulic Model Example with Cross Sections

In addition to the above, each cross section should have the following required information:

  • River name
  • Reach name
  • River station
  • Description
  • Station–elevation data
  • Downstream reach lengths
  • Manning’s n values
  • Main channel bank stations
  • Contraction and expansion coefficients

It is recommended that the station number be visible on the map view to make the cross sections more identifiable. This can be enabled in the Display Options dialog. When numbering stations, they must be in ascending numerical order from downstream to upstream. If changes are made, be sure to renumber the stations.

Converting an arc into a cross section arc can be done automatically or manually. You can automatically do it by taking the following steps:

  1. Define or import a TIN.
  2. Create an area property coverage, a centerline coverage, and a 1D-Hyd cross section coverage.
  3. Use the Extract Cross Section command to extrude the cross sections from the 2D arcs.

To manually create a cross section arc:

  1. Double-click on the cross section arc and select Assign Cross Section.
  2. Define the various elevations and data as desired.

Try out these tips and procedures today in the WMS Community Edition!

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Obtaining Nonstandard Data for Curve Numbers

Calculating curve numbers is a necessary process for many WMS projects. WMS contains a number of tables with suggested soil and land use data for use in calculating the curve number. These are not comprehensive lists of every possible soil data resource, however. These are, only those that are readily downloadable through WMS.

So what do you do if you need to use soil or land use data from a location without data readily available in WMS? You can use nonstandard soil or land use data by creating a file with the data formatted as a table. The format of those land table files can be applied to create a table for any soil data source, such as local shapefiles developed for specific projects.

Example of a land use shapefile

The format for these files is a set of columns as follows:

  1. Soil ID number
  2. Category Label
  3. Hydrologic soil group A
  4. Hydrologic soil group B
  5. Hydrologic soil group C
  6. Hydrologic soil group D

Once you have created a text file with your soil or land use data, import it into WMS as you would any other soil or land use data.

If you’re building your own table for your soil data, there are sources for the tables and charts to help facilitate estimating the curve numbers to put into the table.

For an explanation of or introduction to SCS or runoff curve numbers, a good source is the National Conservation District Employees Association. Their guidance may help clarify the process of creating your own curve numbers.

Additional sources can also be found for soil or land use data. Use whichever data source you feel is appropriate for your project. As long as the data is formatted correctly, WMS should be able to import it.

Try out importing soil and land use data from locations around the world using WMS today!

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Downloading NLCD Data

One of the crucial elements of any project is having data. WMS makes use of a large number of data sources. One type of data that we find frequently used is National Land Cover Database (NLCD) data. NLCD is provided by the MRLC (Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium) as a large collection of raster datasets.

Here are three ways this data can be imported into WMS.

Direct Download

NLCD data can be downloaded from the MRLC site. Much of the other data available on the MRLC site can also be used with WMS.

Downloaded NLCD data can be opened in WMS by selecting the Open macro, browsing to the folder containing the downloaded data, and selecting the desired raster. WMS should be able to recognize the data file and bring it into your project.

Using the Modeling Wizard

NLCD data can also be downloaded while using the Hydrologic Modeling Wizard or the HY-8 Modeling Wizard. To do this:

  1. Start the Hydrologic Modeling Wizard or the HY-8 Modeling Wizard
  2. Create the project in the first step
  3. Define your project bounds and set the project projection
  4. In the Watershed Data step, turn on the Use web services option
  5. In the Download Data (Web Services) step, select one of the NLCD data types
  6. Click the Download Data From Web button to download and import your NLCD data
  7. Enter a raster cell size for the data
  8. Save the data as a file
Using the Get Data Tool

Downloading NLCD data can also be obtained by using the Get Data tool. To use this tool, your project must have a projection already defined. When you have a projection set, do the following:

  1. Using the Get Data tool, click-and-drag a box in the Graphics Window that covers the area where you want NLCD data
  2. Save a file with the NLCD data
  3. Enter the raster cell size for the data
Downloading NLCD data

You might also notice that a lot of other data sources are available through the Modeling Wizard and Get Data tool. Feel free to try downloading data from these sources for your WMS projects.

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